Category: Hong Kong Style

Traditional Hong Kong Dessert @ Luk Lam Dessert 綠林甜品, Sham Shui Po

So there you are having a blast eating your way around Hong Kong. The night comes and your sweet tooth is craving for something to munch on. Now before you decide to gorge yourself silly on yet another round of Hui Lau Shan, why not try something more local and traditional? And that something does not involve drenching shaved ice with sugary syrups.

Glutinous rice balls with sugar and crushed peanuts

Luk Lam Dessert at Sham Shui Po has been in business for almost half a century and they serve over 50 types of desserts – mostly Chinese styled ‘tong sui’, tapioca pearls with fruits, cakes and some self-made grass jellies and puddings. The glutinous rice dumplings with sugar and roasted peanuts (爽滑糖不甩) @ $14 are served warm and have a very likeable soft and chewy texture. I guess you could think of this as round-shaped ‘Muar Chee’ – simple, sweet, nutty and delicious.

So there you are having a blast eating your way around Hong Kong. The night comes and your sweet tooth is craving for so...

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Cafe Matchbox 1960s-Style Cha Chaan Teng @ Causeway Bay, Hong Kong

Tea culture in Hong Kong is very different from what we have in Malaysia. For us, we like to hang out at the 24 hours mamak stalls while the Hongkies enjoy it at their numerous of Cha Chaan Teng. Most of these establishments big or small serve similar kind of food, typically Hong Kong-style Western cuisine like macaroni, fried chicken wings, French toast etc. And they usually come in sets too.
Among the few that we went to in Hong Kong, Cafe Matchbox at Tung Lo Wan (Causeway Bay) is more memorable thanks to its unique menu and 1960s decor, complete with colored tiled walls, light fixtures and old-school Canto music playing in the background.

banana-walnut-pancake

Here, pancakes are eaten all day instead of being just a breakfast and they come with various toppings including minced beef, honey, fried eggs, banana and walnut. One of the sets (tea or coffee included) here is a combo of two of their signature food – Floating Chicken Pie in Green Pea Soup and Banana Walnut Pancake for $HKD45. The chopped crunchy walnuts give a contrasting texture to the soft pancakes and the syrup and banana slices provide the sweet flavor. It tasted as good as it looked, more like a dessert actually.

Tea culture in Hong Kong is very different from what we have in Malaysia. For us, we like to hang out at the 24 hours ma...

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菠蘿包 (Pineapple Bun / ‘Polo Bao’) @ Kam Wah Cafe, Mongkok

I think 菠萝包 (Pineapple Bun or Polo Bao) hardly needs any further introduction. Surely you must have seen and eaten it at least once at some point in your life. You haven’t? Well, just head to the nearest Old Town Kopitiam outlet because they actually serve it on the menu. You might think it is nothing to shout about and I do agree with you on that – if only you are talking about the Pineapple Buns we have locally.
As one of the most eaten buns in Hong Kong either as breakfast or snack during tea break, Polo Bun is yet another thing you shouldn’t miss there. But just so you know, these pineapple-skinned-buns in HK are not halal because the top crust usually consists of pork lard.

polo-bun-tea

The best Polo Bun is said to come from Kam Wah Cafe‘s oven. This unassuming-looking ‘char chan teng’ at Bute Street, Mongkok has been featured on countless media with their proudest being able to make it to CNN. I know I haven’t eaten enough Polo Buns to pass any judgement or claim that this is the best out there, the fact is that Kam Wah’s Polo Bun is pretty darn good.
You can have the Polo Bun plain or sandwiched with butter or egg @ $7, with the former being the more popular choice. The salted butter is said to be home made and gives a good contrast of flavor since the Polo Bun’s crust tastes sweet.

I think 菠萝包 (Pineapple Bun or Polo Bao) hardly needs any further introduction. Surely you must have seen and eaten it at...

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胜香园 Sing Heung Yuen Tea Restaurant @ Central, Hong Kong

central

This is Central, the central business district of Hong Kong. Tucked among the super high-rise buildings are a mix of modern and old restaurants – with some even being Hong Kong’s oldest. Busy in the day and relatively quiet at night, you will definitely step foot here if you plan to visit The Peak or have a drink at Lan Kwai Fong. Our objective here? To have tea break at the most famous Hong Kong style tea restaurant, none other than Sing Heung Yuen.

sing-heung-yuen-back

Since there are already countless hawker and mamak stalls in Malaysia, something like Sing Heung Yuen is already very common for us. Part of the reason why Sing Heung Yuen is so popular is due to the fact that they are one of the few ‘Dai Pai Dong‘ in Hong Kong that is still standing. Most roadside eateries have moved into shoplots over the years, making this traditional type of restaurants a rare sight. And I don’t think I am alone, Sing Heung Yuen actually reminds me of Penang’s Toh Soon Cafe.

condensed-milk-toast

When you are eating in Hong Kong and especially at establishments like this, it is best to expect the worst service and attitude from the staff. So even if you got treated with a unhappy looking face, at least you seen it coming. That being said, the menu here is quite simple and consists of mostly toasts, a couple of macaroni and noodles and complete with drinks you would expect from a coffee shop.

This is Central, the central business district of Hong Kong. Tucked among the super high-rise buildings are a mix of mod...

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